video

Introducing SongBird Survival’s new research project!

In partnership with the University of Exeter, we aim to find out how we can improve the health and welfare of cats and wildlife. Find out more below:

 https://biteable.com/watch/embed/introducing-our-new-research-project-in-partnersh-1455388

Introducing our new research project, in partnership with the University of Exeter on Biteable.

Saving Our Dawn Chorus

What is behind the continuing decline of our songbirds today? What are the underlying reasons and what potential solutions should be investigated?

SongBird Survival is committed to finding out the answers to these questions through commissioning quality scientific research into the issue.

In 2016, we produced a short film, presented by ecologist Katy Thomas, introducing SongBird Survival and looking at where the UK’s famous dawn chorus is heading.

Since the 1970s, populations of songbirds in the UK have crashed, and our dawn chorus is far less rich and diverse than it was in our parents’ and grandparents’ day.

Yellowhammer populations have declined by 55%, cornbunting numbers are down by 87%, whilst tree sparrows have suffered a rapid decline of 95%. These figures are shocking, but what is causing our small birds populations to crash? Loss of habitat? Predation? Intensification of farming?

SongBird Survival believes that research is the key to understanding why.

We fund high quality scientific research to investigate the drivers behind these population declines and promote evidence-based solutions to restore songbird numbers.

With your support we hope to draw attention to the plight of our song and other small birds. Your membership and donations help to fund our research programme and add weight to our work with other organisations. Together, we can save our songbirds before it’s too late.

To find out more about our research and objectives, watch our YouTube video.

SBS YouTube (2)

We partner with like-minded organisations to commission targeted research into areas where scientific evidence is currently sparse, inadequate or lacking.

To date we have partnered with the University of Exeter, the University of Reading, the Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust, and the University of St Andrews, in projects which examine the potential causes behind songbird population decline. Such research produces high-quality, peer-reviewed research papers, contributing to ornithological and ecological knowledge in the UK.

We have exciting future projects in the pipeline, and will be bringing you news of this very soon. In the mean time, further information about our current and past research programmes can be seen on our website.

SongBird Survival: Saving Songbirds With Science