fundraising

Parents time their workload to reduce danger

New study into shared parental workload shows cooperation makes a huge difference to nestling survival

Parent birds timed their arrival and departure at the nest over 67% of the time

This produced a reduction in nest disturbance by 36%

This is the first time a study into parental behaviour during nesting has been carried out and tested the hypothesis that mates synchronize their behaviours to decrease total activity at the nest, which is known to affect predation rate in birds.

It examined if parents synchronise their feeding trips more when nestlings are at the poikilothermic (http://bit.ly/2J2IXMx) stage, and they may be more vulnerable to nest predation due to their inability to escape and survive outside the nest without parental brooding.

Blackcap, Sylvia atricapilla
The subject of this study was the blackcap Sylvia atricapilla, a species characterized by bi-parental care

 
It also investigated the alternation of feeding trips by parents and showed that parents synchronise the majority of their feeding trips during the whole nestling period, and the level of parental synchrony is higher before nestlings develop endothermy (http://bit.ly/2x26bNF).

The study showed the alternation of male and female feeding trips was much higher than would be expected by chance and was positively related to parental synchrony.

It demonstrated that synchronisation of parental feeding trips significantly decreased parental activity at the nest, and nest survival time increased with the synchrony of parental feeding trips.

To read the full report click here

Related content:

More research papers
Help to fund research like this

via SongBird Survival | Blog | Parents time their workload to reduce danger

Advertisements

SBS research discussed in House of Lords

The Earl of Caithness discusses SongBird Survival research in the Lords Grand Committee
Debate on the welfare of animals (10th May 2018)

https://videoplayback.parliamentlive.tv/Player/Index/cedbbebc-760d-493b-99d2-0209c3e17635?in=2018-05-10T13%3A10%3A08%2B01%3A00&out=2018-05-10T13%3A13%3A46%2B01%3A00&audioOnly=False&autoStart=False&statsEnabled=True

Transcript:

“I congratulate my noble friend on bringing forward this debate. I declare my interest as a former cat and dog owner. Promoting and improving the welfare of domestic animals has a simple solution—and the solution is us human beings. We class ourselves as a nation of animal lovers, but the evidence does not prove that. If one studies the PAW report of 2017—a very good document indeed—one will find that a significant minority of animal owners are thoughtless, irresponsible and inconsiderate.
People are thoughtless, in that 98% of cat owners have no idea of the costs of keeping a cat before they have one, which should be a primary consideration. Nearly one-fifth of dogs in the UK are left for five hours or more in a typical weekday; 93,000 dogs are never walked at all. They are irresponsible, in that animals are not receiving primary vaccination courses; 36% of cats are not receiving them, up from 28% in 2011. Some 25% of dogs are not receiving them, up from 18% in 2011, and 55% of rabbits are not receiving them.
People are inconsiderate to their animals—in their diet, as my noble friend mentioned, and in their lack of knowledge of animal laws. Some 15% of owners have not registered their pets with a vet. They are inconsiderate to their neighbours, because poor care of an animal leads to behaviour problems. Some 66% of dog owners would like to change their animal’s behaviour, but they had better change their behaviour first before they can change their animal’s behaviour. They are also inconsiderate to other animals: free-ranging and feral cats kill about 55 million wild birds and a further 220 million small mammals, reptiles and amphibians each year. Cat predation is a national problem. It is estimated that UK cats kill songbirds at 10 times the rate that illegal hunters in the Mediterranean kill migratory species. Researchers at the Universities of Reading and Exeter have reported on the widespread ignorance of that fact by many cat owners—and it is difficult for charities such as the RSPB, because they rely on legacies from cat owners. However, SongBird Survival is working with the University of Exeter and cat owners to get better information and to minimise the adverse effect of pet cats on native wildlife while enhancing cat welfare. What are Her Majesty’s Government doing to help that project—and if they are not helping, why not?
I have some quick questions for my noble friend. What steps are the Government taking to minimise the adverse effect of cat owners’ pets on native wildlife? Will they press the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government to include provisions in planning policy so that, as urban areas grow, a buffer zone of 400 metres is imposed around any new development to help to mitigate the adverse ecological consequences of cat predation, where species of conservation concern nest? Will my noble friend give domestic cats the same legal status as dogs?”

View the full debate and Hansard transcript

Related content:

SongBird Survival research on cats with the University of Exeter
Help us fund this research

via SongBird Survival | SBS research discussed in House of Lords

Can giving be good for business?

Business giving makes up only 2% of UK charities’ total income

70% of surveyed charities admitted that they did not have the time or resources to target SMEs, as it can take ten hours to secure just one donation

Work for good commissioned a survey of 100 small and medium sized businesses and nearly 100 charity fundraisers to find out whether giving can be good for business.

Key findings include:

  • 68% of businesses who give to charity report a positive impact on profits.
  • The more they give, the more benefits they report, including enhanced company reputation, improved recruitment and retention of staff as well as increased profits.

CUSTOMERS AND CONSUMERS NOW EXPECT BUSINESSES TO GIVE BACK, AND REWARD THOSE WHO TO DO SO. BUT THERE IS STILL MORE WORK TO BE DONE

    • 1 in 4 businesses surveyed have yet to give.
    • Only 20% give regularly.

Read the full survey and results here

Sign up to help SongBird Survival here:

Work for Good logo

Related content

Fundraising Regulator logo